Here is a summary of my work. You can also connect on LinkedIn.

My Research

Marcel KnöchelmannI’m a doctoral student at the Department of Information Studies at University College London. My work focuses on scholarly authorship, the economics of publishing, and the history and philosophy of the humanities. In short, I want to find out how and why researchers communicate their research, who a researcher actually is, and whether publishers are doing a good job helping researchers communicate.

Funding

My research is currently fully funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) UK through the London Arts and Humanities Partnership (LAHP).

I’m currently holding a non-financial scholarship of the Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes (German Academic Scholarship Foundation), where I also received a full scholarship for my BA and MA.

I received a 2016 SSP International Fellowship and was the 2015 John Wiley & Sons scholar at UCL.

Professional Experience

I have extensive practical experience in scholarly communication through project work at John Wiley & Sons, De Gruyter, The Academic Book of the Future project, and the early Knowledge Unlatched, among others. Currently, I’m also the editorial assistant for the Journal of the International Arthurian Society. I furthermore have a small assistant position reporting to Cathrin Mohr at the  Chair of  Economic History at Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich.

Many of these projects as well as my PhD work contributed to my will to change scholarly publishing so that it better serves the needs of researchers, instead of letting it grow into just another ROI-led industry, in short: less profit, more equality.

I’m also a member of the German Social Democrats (SPD).

Education

I received a BA from HTWK Leipzig, Germany, and an MA from UCL. Before my university studies, I completed a three-year apprenticeship as a bookseller at an independent bookshop in Germany. Through the close work with customers in those years, he has developed his understanding of the book and media business being content-focussed with the help of services—not the other way around.

University Lectures

During the 17/18 academic year, I worked as a Teaching Assistant for the MA in Publishing at UCL. I lecture(d) on the following topics:

  • Marketing and strategy in scholarly publishing (UCL)
  • The history of scholarly publishing (UCL)
  • Digital publishing processes (UCL)
  • Microeconomics in book publishing industries (UCL)
  • Academic writing and discourse (HTWK Leipzig)
  • Managerial accounting (HTWK Leipzig)

Panels and Speaking

Get in touch for keynotes or panels, or connect on LinkedIn. I’m happy to talk about Open Access, economic issues in scholarly communication, or current and historical perspectives on research in the humanities. Previous keynotes and talks include among others:

  • Society for Scholarly Publishing Annual Meeting, Boston
  • EbookCamp, Hamburg
  • Leipzig Book Fair
  • London Book Fair
  • Academic Book of the Future Week, British Library
  • SYP conference, Oxford
  • OpenUP Final Conference, Brussels

Short Bio for Conferences

Marcel Knöchelmann is a doctoral student at the Department of Information Studies at University College London. His work focuses on scholarly authorship, the economics of publishing, and the history and philosophy of the humanities. More on his work can be found on his blog lepublikateur.de.

Marcel has extensive practical experience in scholarly communication through work at John Wiley & Sons, De Gruyter, The Academic Book of the Future project, Knowledge Unlatched, and the International Arthurian Society, among others. Before his university studies, Marcel completed a three-year apprenticeship as a bookseller at an independent bookshop in Germany. He currently works as a teaching assistant at UCL and as a freelance editor and consultant.

Marcel received a 2016 SSP International Fellowship, was the 2015 John Wiley & Sons scholar, and holds a scholarship from the German National Merit Foundation. His research is funded by the AHRC UK through the London Arts and Humanities Partnership (LAHP).

 

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