Tag: Open Access

Reasoning and Interest: Clustering Open Access

Reasoning and Interest-Clustering Open Access_KnöchelmannThe conception of an open future with scholarly publications being freely accessible, sharable, and reusable cannot be easily subsumed under a single term. That is, it can. But the term has conflicting objectives. The reasoning behind Open Access interests is diverse with two essential concepts being ‘research advancement’ and ‘economic benefit’. This article clusters stakeholders regarding their Open Access interest and reasoning, leading to the clusters a Open Access as a threat, b a pain, c the ideal Open Access, and d the exploitative Open Access. 

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Library Publishing, or How to Make Use of Your Opportunities

While the talk of transition and failed disruption abounds in scholarly communication, the opportunities for new paths are available. Libraries are set to make use of these opportunities. With forms of institutional self-publishing, libraries can drive change and at the same time surpass market failures of the prevalent transition period. With their already available (affiliated) brands, library publishing can lure researchers out of their inertia and prevent the uptake of self-publishing. This article will look into library publishing as an optional model, starting with a separation of self-publishing and institutional self-publishing and followed by a discussion of Book Processing Charges, the cost of monograph publishing, and how libraries can empower change with an effective reallocation of budgets into publishing initiatives.

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Open Access: From Opening Access to Justifying Business

This text is a revised[1] version of the speech I gave on 11th November 2017 in Oxford. I was invited by the Society of Young Publishers to give insights into my work regarding Open Access.

Considering that most of the talks on Open Access either showcase individual success story of Open Access, or bemoan how scholarly publishing is broken and only Open Science can fix it—without acknowledging the complexity of research communication, I wanted to provide a critique on why the current development of Open Access is not providing the hoped-for benefits. Surely the talk touched only some points of the already large movement, but it’s something that is not being talked about much at conferences. The talk sparked some interesting conversations, which is why I wanted to publish the content of the talk to keep the conversation going. Please do reach out to me in public @lepublikateur or in private marcel.knochelmann.15(at)ucl.ac.uk.

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Open Access as the New Standard: Disruption at What Cost?

open access disruption at what costThe current phase of transition shows that gold Open Access (OA) is likely to be a disruptive force for the establishment. Libraries and institutions aim to cut costs by pushing for more Open Access; publishers seek to raise profits, or at least stay in business. New ventures are growing in between those needs: they’re cheaper than established offerings, but can survive on lower profit margins. Those ventures gradually build the infrastructure for future scholarly communication. But at what cost?

*** This article originally appeared with minor changes in SYP’s InPrint 2017 autumn edition; it’s the teaser for my talk at SYP’s conference in Oxford on  the 11th November 2017. ***

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Open Access and the Prisoner’s Dilemma

Open Access Book PublishingGold Open Access is an accepted, yet isolated model in academic book publishing. Publishing houses only dare to scale open access in small steps. While books, especially monographs, are still the preferred medium to communicate scholarship in many disciplines, foremost in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, the overall market of academic books is in recession. Less sold books means less access. Large scale Open Access publishing may be a solution. But publishing houses seem to be in a prisoner’s dilemma: to adapt Open Access on a large enough scale required a systematic approach in which all publishing houses would have to act. My recently published study (June 2017, UCL Press) provides a theoretical explanation for this.

 

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Sci-Hub—Elsevier: 62 million for more openness—15 million against

“This ruling should stand as a warning to those who knowingly violate others’ rights,” comments Matt McKay of the STM Association on the decision of a New York district court against Sci-Hub. The court ruled that Sci-Hub, the Library of Genesis, and similar illegal projects will have to pay $15m to the claimant. Sounds about right, it’s copyright infringement. Of all the laws, publishers should hold up those dealing with intellectual property the highest.

Yet, the claimant is Elsevier, which gives the ruling a bitter taste.

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Accelerating Openness: Foundations as Driving Force in Science Publishing

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation just announced the launch of a new open access platform, Gates Open Research. The Wellcome Trust’s own platform is already running with F1000. All the while, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative opens research with cutting edge services. Funders become a major force changing the scientific ecosystem from the outside, accelerating openness and time-to-publish.

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Academic Publishing Market in the UK

An Analysis of the Retail Sales of Academic Books in the UK

The following essay will analyse the academic publishing market in the UK. The analysis will incorporate and focus on data provided by Nielsen Bookscan in order to show the development of retail sales in the UK.  University College London

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Disruption and Open Access: Thoughts on the Strategic Impact

Theories and paradigms often create the background for buzzwords. Content marketing or storytelling for example. Or sustainability. And certainly disruptive innovation. In publishing, there is nearly no conference without a discussion about the disruption of the industry. May it be ebooks disrupting print, self-publishing disrupting the fiction book publishing model, or Open Access disrupting the journal subscription model. But the discussion shouldn’t be about the disruption which isn’t predictable anyways. Discussion should be about the strategic impact.

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