Tag: Book Publishing

Open Access as the New Standard: Disruption at What Cost?

open access disruption at what costThe current phase of transition shows that gold Open Access (OA) is likely to be a disruptive force for the establishment. Libraries and institutions aim to cut costs by pushing for more Open Access; publishers seek to raise profits, or at least stay in business. New ventures are growing in between those needs: they’re cheaper than established offerings, but can survive on lower profit margins. Those ventures gradually build the infrastructure for future scholarly communication. But at what cost?

*** This article originally appeared with minor changes in SYP’s InPrint 2017 autumn edition; it’s the teaser for my talk at SYP’s conference in Oxford on  the 11th November 2017. ***

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Open Access and the Prisoner’s Dilemma

Open Access Book PublishingGold Open Access is an accepted, yet isolated model in academic book publishing. Publishing houses only dare to scale open access in small steps. While books, especially monographs, are still the preferred medium to communicate scholarship in many disciplines, foremost in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, the overall market of academic books is in recession. Less sold books means less access. Large scale Open Access publishing may be a solution. But publishing houses seem to be in a prisoner’s dilemma: to adapt Open Access on a large enough scale required a systematic approach in which all publishing houses would have to act. My recently published study (June 2017, UCL Press) provides a theoretical explanation for this.

 

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Disruptive Innovation: The Dilemma of the Fittest

Keynote speech for the eBookCamp on 7th November 2015, Hamburg
By Marcel Knöchelmann

Disruptive Innovation: The Dilemma of the Fittest

The topic Disruptive Innovation is a long time around in the publishing industry. At least as long as the eBookCamp takes place. That may be due to the fact that for around five years many in the publishing industry realise that Amazon initiates some changes. Yet, although it is a well discussed topic, it is interesting in which context it often appears, or that people actively call for disruption. It won’t be an easy task, the attempt to disrupt something. And it wasn’t even the purpose of the theory of 1997 to deliver a How-to-disrupt-guide. On the contrary, the theory attempted to explain why companies fail when their markets get disrupted. The very essence is: it is their strength. The strength of a company hinders it to get through a disruption.

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